Car Kit

Car Kit

Car Emergency Kit

With stories like this KCRA Stranded Story and this SoCal Surprise
being prepared for winter travel is crucial. Being prepared for travel is crucial all year long. Lost in the desert is just as deadly as stranded in the mountains. Most of this kit should fit in a large backpack. The premise of a Car Kit is to keep you safe should you get lost or stranded while traveling or to help get you home should a disaster or catastrophic event happen while you are at work or away from home.

These are the categories you’ll be dealing with:
Food
Water
Fire
Shelter
Rescue
First Aid
Weapons
Other Tools & Necessities

Let’s break it down:
Food
You can use regular snack type foods and just eat them as snacks and replace them as you go (self rotation) or you can look into the high calorie, 5yr shelf life, meal bars (you’ll have to remember to change these out as they get old. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B008DEYC86 )

Water
Do you normally keep a gallon or two in your trunk? We keep gallon bottles and some of the 1/2 pint type. We use them all the time and just replace them as needed. You can get pre packed storage water. ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000GFJV7M ) a small water filter could be priceless here.

Fire
You should keep at least 3 methods of fire starting handy. FireSteel, matches, butane lighter, flint and steel, magnesium, even a magnifying glass can work. Get some good small tinder to go with it. Things like WetFire, TinderQuik, FastFire, or check YouTube for “how to make tinder”. There are a ton of great ways to make you own. Just be sure to test it BEFORE your life depends on it.

Shelter
Tarps, tube tents, small dome tents, large heavy duty garbage bags… All of these can be used for shelter. Along with shelter, you should have some blankets, gloves, and socks. Ponchos for the number of people your car can carry or at least for each family member.

Rescue
Fire is a great rescue signal. Signal mirrors, orange flagging tape, road flares, and no burn smoke canisters can all make you easier to find. Most civilian search teams use FRS or GMRS radios. Consider keeping one in your car kit. A very long run time LED flashlight will be priceless and can be used to signal aircraft and searchers. Thrunite, ZebraLight, Xeno, Fenix,

First Aid
Pick up a medium sized first aid kit from any of the major outdoor chain stores (Cabellas, BassPro, Dicks, Gander Mountain, etc…) then find a good trauma kit like the one from Dark Angel Medical ( http://www.darkangelmedical.com/ ). These are expensive but you can look around and build one for yourself for a lot less. Getting some basic first aid training is awesome as well. The Red Cross does some. Your local community college can help out too. If you’re looking for more advanced classes check this out ( http://thepatriotnurse.com ). The book “Where there is no doctor” could be great reading on those cold nights when you’re stranded.

Weapons
Knife, machete, hatchet, handgun, rifle… Which of these would you want if you were lost in the woods for a week? Oh, and don’t forget the ammo!

Other Tools & Necessities
Additional batteries for your gadgets, an extra flashlight, rope, paracord, duct tape, compass, map, good MultiTool, some aluminum foil, GPS Unit, stainless steel canteen cup, zip ties…

You could get by with 10% of this but what would you leave behind? This list is very long but your route and destination will help dictate what items are necessities.

Now, the follow up to the stranded family.

Www.tinyurl.com/KCRASTRANDEDFOLLOWUP

4 Comments

  1. How long will water in the plastic bottle last in a hot car trunk in a really hot inviroment?

    Reply
    • There’s A LOT of debate on this topic. We live in an area that regularly gets over 100 degrees in the summer. So, I wanted a REAL answer to this as well. After reading a couple dozen articles and reports, we actually get more BPA exposure from canned foods than hot water bottles. It basically comes down to the type of plastic. The lining of cans is soft by comparison to commercial water bottles. The DHEA myth has been debunked but BPA at high levels is still being looked into. They seem to agree that some level is bad for you. They can’t agree on how much. The best advice is to keep the water in an ice chest (even without ice) to help minimize the temperature extremes. We keep our water where we can get to it. 1/2 liter bottles and we go through them all the time. I don’t think a case lasts a month in our car before its all gone. So, maybe a monthly rotation if that works for you. Personally, I’m not overly concerned about it. I drank out of garden hoses as a kid (and last week) and managed to survive. Hope this helps.

      Reply
  2. Thank you!!!! Plan accordingly and make sure if you are in remote regions, be prepared.

    Reply
  3. I live by mountains and I wish people would think about this stuff when they go snow mobiling and riding atvs. It doesn’t take much to get yourself into a real bad situation in a hurry.

    Reply

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